sarahbyrdd: (Cooking)
http://mamanskitchen.com/cardamom-spiced-quince-rosewater-jam/



I love how the color transforms when you cook it.

Slightly different method this time.  Small chop then cook with minimal stirring.

4 lbs diced quince (cored but not peeled)
2 lbs sugar
1 lbs honey
4 Tbls lemon juice
16 cardomom pods. (which just tossed into the pot, I don't know that I'll be able to fish them out later per the receipe)
2 Tbs. rosewater

-The cooking method seems much like steaming rice.
-That was a lot of chopping
-After 2 hours the color was lovely but the syrup still needed cooking down ... for almost another hour.
-I'm not really tasting the cardomom except a tiny bit on the finish

-I cooked up the cores and pips and strained off a cup of pectin to be used in something else down the road.  I'm canning it with the jam.  Beer jam?

Yield: 4 lbs quince = 11 4oz jars, 4 8oz, plus 8oz of pectin

-I saved out 2 quince to make more liqueur.
sarahbyrdd: (Cooking)
Quince enablers strike again.

http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/membrillo_quince_paste/

http://www.thejoykitchen.com/recipe/quince-jelly

https://afoodiesfallfromgrace.wordpress.com/2010/11/06/quince-jelly-two-ways/ *** because I wanted to use honey I mostly followed this one.

http://www.nannaville.com/?tag=cotignac

And a little help from Nostradamus.  No really Nostradamus.

Part 2 Chapter XV To make a quince jelly of superb beauty, goodness, flavour and excellence fit to set before a King, and which lasts a good long time.
Take whatever quinces you like, as long as they are fully ripe and yellow.
Cut them up into quarters without peeling them (for those who peel them do not know what they are doing, since the skin enhances the smell), and divide each quarter into five or six pieces.
Remove the seeds, because the fruit will turn into jelly perfectly well without them.
As you are cutting them up, place them in a basin full of water, for unless they are plunged into water the moment they are cut up they will turn black.
Once they are cut up, boil them in a good quantity of water until they are well done, almost to the point of shrivelling up.
When they have boiled thoroughly, strain this liquid through a thick piece of new linen and squeeze the whole preparation through it as hard as you can.
Then take this decoction, and if there are six pounds of it, take one and a half pounds of Madeira sugar and put it into the decoction, and bring it to the boil over a gentle charcoal fire until you see that.
towards the end, it is reducing in volume considerably.
Then damp the fire down, so that it does not burn at the sides -- which would give a bad colour to the jelly.
Then, when it is nearly done, and so as to know when it is done perfectly, take some of it with a spatula or silver spoon and put it on a platter, and if you see that when it has cooled it comes off as a globule, without sticking either here or there, then it is done.
  Take it off the fire and wait for the scum on the top to settle, then pour the still-hot liquid into small wooden or glass containers.
And if you want to write or gouge something on the bottom of the container, you can do so, for it will be seen easily [through the jelly].
For the colour will be as diaphanous as an oriental ruby.
So excellent will the colour be -- and the taste even more so -- that it may be given to sick and healthy alike.

I decided to strip this batch down to the barest ingredients: quince, sweetener, water.  For the jelly I used honey, and for the quince paste I used sugar.

There was no trouble getting the jelly up to 222 as the recipe recommended, and I was a little concerned because it didn't convincingly pass the saucer test, but it seems to be gelling nicely in the jars.

The paste was another matter.  I burnt the bottom in the first pan.  Switched to a second pan.  Managed to get it to touch 200 or so but then it started burning again so I gave up and threw it in a parchment lined baking dish in a 225 oven as suggested by some of the modern recipes I'd seen. Almost 2 hours later it was around 214, which I'm calling good enough, and it's cooling on the window sill.   We'll see how that works out.  Worst case I'll spoon blobs in to jars and it will still taste amazing.
sarahbyrdd: (Cooking)
Having come into a few pounds of quince, I'm trying a few things.

Ratafia inspired by the spices from this site http://www.historicfood.com/Quinces%20Recipe.htm , but the cooked method from this site http://missioncommunitymarket.org/2013/09/mercado-kitchen-quince-ratafia-two-ways/

1 lb quince chopped, cores and peels (fuzz washed off)
3/4 cup turbinado sugar
2 whole cloves
1 2 inch piece of cinnamon stick
3 grains of paradise (in lieu of white pepper)
1 quart brandy (AppStrawBrandies raisin brandy, made by a local CT guy, which my wine shop recommended for the project).


And also Paste of Genua







To make Paste of Genua, as they doe beyond the Seas







Boile faire yellow Peare-Quinces tender in their skinnes, and so let them stand vntill the next day, till they be colde, then pare them, and scrape all the pulp from the coare, then take as much pulp of yellow Peaches as the pulp of Quinces doth weigh, and dry it vpon a little chafingdish of coales, alwaies stirring it, then boile these pulps in double refined Sugar, and so let it boile, always stirring it vntill it come to a candie height, with as much Rosewater as will melt that Sugar, and put in your pulps, alway stirring it in the boiling, vntill it come from the bottome of the Posnet, then fashion it vpon a pie plate, or a sheete of glasse, some like leaues, some like halfe fruits, and some you may print with moulds, set them into a warme Ouen after the bread is drawne, or into a Stoue, the next day you may turne them, and when the stuffe is through dry, you may box it, and keepe it for all the yeere, but be sure it be through dried before you lay it vp in store.

From John Murrel, A Daily Exercise for Ladies and Gentlewomen, (London: 1617)


I only have one day to play, so I'm going to proceed as for apple sauce (rough chop peel & pips included, cook, food mill), then cook an equal weight of peaches, hit them with the stick blender, and combine and add an equal weight of sugar and a TINY amount of rosewater to avoid it tasting like soap, and cook down until it will set up.  Then dry as for fruit leather: http://www.simplyrecipes.com/recipes/how_to_make_fruit_leather/

I can see why the added colorants in period.  It's a rather dull tan color, but the flavor is good.  As I was stirring in the rosewater I was strongly reminded of turkish delight.

Quince, sure has lots of pectin in it.  I could see gel building up on pips that had been left in the sink.

The final weights were: 1 lb. quince mash, 3/4 lb. peach mash, 1 lb. sugar, 1/2 tsp rosewater.

**Two weeks later I cut the paste into pretty bits.  It looks like the top crystalized a bit, and the middle ones are still quite moist though they do hold their shape.

P1010001
P1010002

Edit:  After the summer I checked the tin and it had gone to mold.  Oh well.  I'll try again eventually.

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sarahbyrdd

October 2016

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